Michigan Criminal Law: Assaultive Crimes

Michigan has a litany of criminal statutes that may be utilized and charged by the “People” (i.e., the local prosecutor or city-attorney) if a person engages in alleged assaultive behavior, commits an alleged battery, or some combination of both.

For information on some of the more common charges, please click on the links below or scroll over the subsections noted near the heading for this topic.
For more information on Assault and Battery allegations, click here.
For more information on Domestic Violence allegations, click here.
For more information on Felonious Assault allegations, click here.
For more information on Assault causing Great Bodily Harm, click here.
For information on Assault by Strangulation, click here.
For information on Assault with Intent to Commit Murder, click here.
For information on Resisting and Obstructing a Police Officer, click here.

For information on Interference with an Electronic Communications Device (a charge often added to allegations involving Domestic Assault if a phone is allegedly destroyed or use of a phone is allegedly interfered with) click here.
Our experienced trial attorneys fight hard for our Michigan clients. We represent clients statewide. For a free initial consultation, feel free to contact us at (517) 507-5077.
Anyone charged, of course, is presumed innocent. The prosecutor would need to prove the elements of the offense beyond a reasonable doubt if the matter proceeded to trial. Simply because a person is charged does not mean that they will be convicted.

If you need specific legal advice for your particular circumstances, we encourage you to privately consult with a lawyer. Circumstances may vary significantly.
If you are charged with an offense and cannot afford to pay for your own defense, the court may appoint you an attorney payable at the public’s expense. You have a right to counsel.